Wunderkammer

How Japan Copied American Culture and Made it Better

I really love the modern world

(Source: putthison)

America's Economy Is Officially Inside-Out

Be interesting to track historical instances where this was the case. I get the feeling it’s common in developing countries

(Source: emergentfutures)

Microsoft is caught in a reality-distortion field — Stowe Boyd -- Gigaom Research

stoweboyd:

an excerpt

People don’t want Word, Excel, and Powerpoint, per se. In fact, those apps are generally considered bloatware, with confusing, UX-challenged, and overwrought design. What people want is something that doesn’t exist, but which Google and Apple are moving toward. People want to be able to view, edit, and create documents that are largely compatible with the de facto core standard of Office documents, the basic 20% of the three apps. And they want those documents to be sharable with other people, no matter what solutions those other people are using.

The big shift here is that in this era, the hegemony of Office is not going to dictate hardware decisions. People won’t put up with the limitations of Windows-based tablets from Microsoft or Nokia because they are the only place to get full-fidelity Office. And the simple reason is that people don’t want full-fidelity office, really.

Our work communications have moved outside of the interior of documents. The pattern of reviewing a Word document with internal comments and tracking changes is being displaced by external comments — in a work media tool (Yammer, Chatter, etc.) or in a social editing tool like Quip (see I want a social editor, but Quip isn’t there quite yet) or Draft (see Draft is a small and simple co-editor). In the heyday of Office, email with attachments was state of the art. Microsoft has acquired Yammer and moved Office to the cloud with Office 365, but they haven’t seen the change that is going on the perimeter of their model of office work.

So Frank Shaw is saying that Microsoft — at least under this CEO — is still fighting the last war for office productivity, while the world has moved on to a new form factor for work, where the social interactions of people cooperating are not concealed inside documents, but are instead mediated outside of them. And, as a result, the documents themselves can be much simpler in their internal architecture. We are relying on social architecture, now, instead.

(h/t ParisLemon)

(via emergentfutures)

Chart of the Day: The Booze-ometer

priceonomics:

image

Marketers fill rum commercials with Caribbean beaches and whisky commercials with Scotsmen and Irishmen. The actual imbibers look a bit different.

Read The Blog Post Here »

superamit:

I wrote this journal entry quite a while ago, but it’s taken me several weeks to decide to share it. Here goes…
“Fatigue”
Decadron, 1mg. Adderall XR, 30mg. Caffeine, 1-2 cups of coffee or bottles of Yerba Mate a day.
Go to bed tired.
Wake up in the middle of the night, tired.
Wake up in the morning, tired.
I’ve had the misfortune* of experiencing a number of mysterious ailments in the year and a half since my bone marrow transplant. Blood clots, nausea, crazy teeth sensitivity, incessant itching all over my body, muscle atrophy, easy bruising, arthritis, inability to eat or drink certain foods, more nausea, anemia. Broadly, many of these are due to a not-uncommon condition known as GvHD (Graft vs Host Disease) where my donor’s T-cells orchestrate an immune system attack on my body’s organs. Others are likely due to the battery of medications I’m on.
But the hardest thing to deal with? Fatigue.
And I feel wussy talking about it, because what’s the big deal about being tired?
Except when it lasts days, weeks, MONTHS.
When it makes it hard to motivate myself to do anything, when I can’t sleep, can’t function, and can’t ever not feel tired.
When some days I go into work in the morning and have to leave an hour later without a single thing done because I walked too much the day before.
When I spend every weekday morning at the gym to help regain muscle mass and regain stamina… And only barely notice a change.
When it’s Sunday night at 8, I’m already nodding off, and I doubt I’ll have the energy to be my best tomorrow.
When I feel like I’m letting down my friends because I’m too tired to hang out in the evenings. And letting down my coworkers because I can’t muster the energy and enthusiasm I owe them and owe my work. When I feel like a paler, weaker, imitation of my former self.
That’s when the fatigue feels like just about the worst part of all this.
I went to a Bone Marrow Transplant symposium a couple months back and learned that post-BMT fatigue can last 2-3 years, or forever. That the ‘new normal’ never really is. That people go back to work part-time in 12-18 months. Some never go back full-time.
I went back in 9 months. Full-time, and incredibly eager to go back to living a normal life. But my normal life is running me into the ground.
I feel like I shouldn’t be complaining… because I’m still alive, right? I’m still breathing. When they found this thing in me, I had a death sentence. A year later, I was filled with hope. Now?
But writing this feels therapeutic. And reminds me that it’s a long road.
I need to give myself time.
* It’s not all misfortune, mind you. The silver lining on GvHD is that some amount of it is correlated with a lower rate of Leukemia recurrence. That’s a good thing.

superamit:

I wrote this journal entry quite a while ago, but it’s taken me several weeks to decide to share it. Here goes…

“Fatigue”

Decadron, 1mg. Adderall XR, 30mg. Caffeine, 1-2 cups of coffee or bottles of Yerba Mate a day.

Go to bed tired.

Wake up in the middle of the night, tired.

Wake up in the morning, tired.

I’ve had the misfortune* of experiencing a number of mysterious ailments in the year and a half since my bone marrow transplant. Blood clots, nausea, crazy teeth sensitivity, incessant itching all over my body, muscle atrophy, easy bruising, arthritis, inability to eat or drink certain foods, more nausea, anemia. Broadly, many of these are due to a not-uncommon condition known as GvHD (Graft vs Host Disease) where my donor’s T-cells orchestrate an immune system attack on my body’s organs. Others are likely due to the battery of medications I’m on.

But the hardest thing to deal with? Fatigue.

And I feel wussy talking about it, because what’s the big deal about being tired?

Except when it lasts days, weeks, MONTHS.

When it makes it hard to motivate myself to do anything, when I can’t sleep, can’t function, and can’t ever not feel tired.

When some days I go into work in the morning and have to leave an hour later without a single thing done because I walked too much the day before.

When I spend every weekday morning at the gym to help regain muscle mass and regain stamina… And only barely notice a change.

When it’s Sunday night at 8, I’m already nodding off, and I doubt I’ll have the energy to be my best tomorrow.

When I feel like I’m letting down my friends because I’m too tired to hang out in the evenings. And letting down my coworkers because I can’t muster the energy and enthusiasm I owe them and owe my work. When I feel like a paler, weaker, imitation of my former self.

That’s when the fatigue feels like just about the worst part of all this.

I went to a Bone Marrow Transplant symposium a couple months back and learned that post-BMT fatigue can last 2-3 years, or forever. That the ‘new normal’ never really is. That people go back to work part-time in 12-18 months. Some never go back full-time.

I went back in 9 months. Full-time, and incredibly eager to go back to living a normal life. But my normal life is running me into the ground.

I feel like I shouldn’t be complaining… because I’m still alive, right? I’m still breathing. When they found this thing in me, I had a death sentence. A year later, I was filled with hope. Now?

But writing this feels therapeutic. And reminds me that it’s a long road.

I need to give myself time.

* It’s not all misfortune, mind you. The silver lining on GvHD is that some amount of it is correlated with a lower rate of Leukemia recurrence. That’s a good thing.

WHEN SOMEONE SITS DOWN NEXT TO ME ON THE METRO

wheninwashington:

explore-blog:

What Pangea would look like mapped with modern political borders – a modern mashup reflecting cartography’s long history as power, propaganda, and art.
(↬ It’s Okay To Be Smart)

explore-blog:

What Pangea would look like mapped with modern political borders – a modern mashup reflecting cartography’s long history as power, propaganda, and art.

( It’s Okay To Be Smart)

(Source: , via explore-blog)

“What good is it to save the planet if humanity suffers?”

—   ExxonMobil CEO Rex Tillerson, in making the case to shareholders that burning oil is the best means for human progress, and that cutting emissions is a fools errand.  (via climateadaptation)

Boneheaded comment of the day

putthison:

Our Beloved Sponsors

Twice a month, we like to thank our sponsors for supporting our site. Our sponsors this month include Cottonwork, Flint & Tinder, Frank Clegg Leatherworks, and The Hanger Project.

Cottonwork sells custom-made shirts over the internet. You can order by either submitting your measurements online or sending them your best fitting shirt to be copied. From there, they have a nice online interface for you to work with as you design your shirt. Basically, as you make selections for the collar style, fit, and cloth, you get to see your shirt being built in real-time, so that you have an idea of what it might look like. They also have a free starter kit you can order from their website. In it, you’ll find some coupon codes for your first order, some sample fabrics, and a measuring tape.

Our second sponsor Flint & Tinder specializes in American-made undergarments, including undershirts, boxers, briefs, boxer-briefs, and socks. This summer, they’re also launching something they’re calling The All-Summer Board Short. It’s basically a pair of swimming trunks that you can also use as regular shorts (they have belt loops, pockets, and don’t have any crazy patterns that would limit them to the water). The idea is to give men the option of buying a pair of swim trunk that they can actually wear all summer long, even if they don’t go near water that often.

Our third sponsor is Frank Clegg Leatherworks. Frank Clegg, the proprietor, has been making leather goods for over forty years. Today, he makes a range of leathergoods and accessories out of his workshop in Fall Rivers, Massachusetts. He has a pretty big selection of things he sells in his online shop. There are briefcases made out of a sturdy harness belting leather (which is a kind of vegetable tanned leather treated with extra fat liquors during the condition process), some travel bags made from shrunken leather, and some wallets, card cases, and iPhone sleeves for people looking for small gifts.

Finally, our last sponsor is The Hanger Project. As their name suggests, they specialize in high-end hangers, but they also sell a range of other things, such as Saphir shoe care products, closet organization accessories, and neckties.

So thanks to all four of our sponsors for their support. We genuinely appreciate their support.   

If you want to advertise on Put This On, just email us at contact@putthison.com.

buzzfeed:

“I didn’t read the book.”